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At the beginning of ‘Casino Royale’ a car pulled up in front of the entrance to a modern office building in Prague, Czech Republic. It was Dryden (Malcolm Sinclair), the section chief of Mi6 in Prague, who got out of the car. He took an elevator to get to his office. He was surprised to see James Bond waiting there. Bond killed traitorous Dryden and became ’00’ agent with licence to kill.

That sequence was filmed at Danube House building located at Karolinska street in Prague. Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicThe first scene was filmed with the camera set at the entrance to the building opposite to Danube House. In the shot you can see the roof above the entrance as in photo presented below.Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicIn the photo below you can see Danube House on the right and the entrance to the opposite building where the camera was located on the left. The car arrived from pedestrian bridge above Rohanske Nabrezi street visible in the center of the photo.Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicDryden got out of the car and looked around. He was filmed from so called worm’s-eye view with facade of Danube House visible in background.Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicIn the next photo you can see elevators in Danube House – the same as in the film.Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicThrough glass facade of Danube House from Rohanske Nabrezi street you can see the corridor where Dryden was walking down to his office.Danube House in Prague, Czech RepublicNext photo was taken from pedestrian bridge above Rohanske Nabrezi street. On the right side you can see the entrance to Danube House where Dryden parked his car. On the left you can see the glass facade with the corridor and elevators behind it. Danube House in Prague, Czech Republic

Cinematographer Phil Méheux, who shot ‘Casino Royale’ said: ‘If you want to do something quite different and turn everyone around, do something in black-and-white!’ Therefore the opening seqence was black-and-white. He also said that some cinematographers were shooting color that was later removed in the digital intermediate, but he didn’t like the look of that. For that reason he used about 6000 feet of black-and-white Eastman Double-X [5222] Kodak film.

Sources:
– „James Bond. Szpieg którego kochamy” Michał Grzesiek, Wydawnictwo Bukowy Las 2011
www.theasc.com

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